Are Supermarkets Open On Sunday In Spain?

Are Supermarkets Open On Sunday In Spain
Supermarket Hours – Quick View –

CONSUM Mon to Sat / 9am – 9:30pm Sunday / 9am – 2. 30pm MERCADONA Mon to Sat / 9am – 9:30pm Sunday  / 9am – 3pm MENDOZA Mon to Sat / 8:30am – 9:30pm Sunday  / 9am – 3pm (from 19/6)
ALDI Mon to Sat / 9am – 9:30pm Sunday / 9am – 9pm LIDL Mon to Sat / 9am – 10pm Sunday / 9am – 10pm DEALZ Mon to Sat / 9am – 10pm Sunday / 9am – 10pm

Currently in Spain there are certain laws that restrict shops opening on Sundays. During summer and holiday periods (Christmas and Easter etc. ) all the major supermarkets will open on Sundays. During off season peak times they will not be open. Smaller supermarkets are open on Sundays all year. I would suggest trying Quicksave or the Albir Mini Market.

and the newly opened Paradise Albir international supermarket. Quicksave Albir is currently open on Sunday from 10am until 2pm. Albir Supermarket (Mini Market / 24hr shop) is currently open on Sunday from 8am until 10pm.

With the arrival of summer in Albir the supermarkets give us extended hours to do our shopping. Laws in Spain only allow supermarkets to open on a certain number of Sundays in a year, this was to assist small independent supermarkets and mini markets who needed to take a day off.

Are supermarkets open on Sundays in Spain?

Opening hours of shops in Spain – The classic Spanish shops are open from Monday to Friday at least from 9:30 to 13:30 and from 17 to 20. Many open in the morning already at 9 o’clock (bakeries also earlier) and close only at 14 o’clock. While in northern Spain the shops are open in the evening from 16:30 to 19:30, the business hours in southern Spain are usually from 17:30 to 20:30.

Saturdays are often only open in the morning. On Sundays the shops in Spain are traditionally closed. There are more and more exceptions to the above opening hours of shops in Spain: In the tourist regions, many shops are open much longer.

Some shops do not have afternoon rest at all and are open all the time. In many cities, the shops are also open on Sundays. Depending on the city and region, this can be all year round or limited to the summer or the pre-Christmas period. ´ The new shopping centres on the outskirts of the city or the large department stores such as El Corte de Ingles have also abolished the siesta.

Is everything closed on Sundays in Spain?

Often people assume that the Sunday closures are a reflection of Spain’s laidback lifestyle, and that Spaniards still see Sundays as a day of rest. While it is true that most Spaniards do still use Sundays to relax, eat, and spend time with family, it’s not entirely that simple.

Why are supermarkets closed on Sundays in Spain?

Take a stroll through any small or medium-sized Spanish town on a Sunday, and you’ll notice that the majority of its high-street shops and businesses are shuttered up. Even in bigger cities, many still close on Sunday. Often people assume that the Sunday closures are a reflection of Spain’s laidback lifestyle, and that Spaniards still see Sundays as a day of rest.

  1. While it is true that most Spaniards do still use Sundays to relax, eat, and spend time with family, it’s not entirely that simple;
  2. Others assume it’s a legacy of Spain’s Catholic culture, and that everyone’s at mass, but that’s become less and less true in recent decades, and the reality is that Spain’s Sunday trading laws are often the reason behind the closures, depending on where you are;

READ MORE:  Spanish habits that foreigners just don’t get  Manual widget for ML (class=”ml-manual-widget-container”) Sunday Trading Sunday trading laws are not unique to Spain. Many countries around the world place limits on which, how, for how long, and how often shops and businesses can open on Sundays.

But many countries across Europe, like Portugal, Italy, and the U. K, have more liberal trading hours legislation. In fact, the European Commission ranked Spain as the country with the second highest number of restrictions on commercial trade in the EU.

A map of which countries where large supermarkets are generally open on non-holiday Sundays. Green: Large supermarkets and shopping centers are generally open on Sundays. Blue: Large supermarkets are allowed to be open for 6 hours or less on Sundays. Red: Large supermarkets are generally closed on Sundays.

Map: Imre Kristoffer Eilertsen/Wikipedia (CC BY 4. 0) Spain’s law First things first, as with many policies in Spain, Sunday trading legislation is delegated to the autonomous communities. Article 1 of Law 1/2004, which outlines rules on business hours more broadly, gives businesses the liberty to determine the days and times of their commercial activity, however it must work within the framework of the law and the rules of the autonomous community.

That is to say, each regional government has the final say on its Sunday opening hours, and in many parts of Spain Sunday opening is allowed once a month – normally at the beginning of the month – and on Sundays during special shopping seasons like Christmas and Easter, but also during sales periods. According to the law, the businesses free to open as and when they please are: 

  •  Hospitality establishments and bakeries
  •  Petrol stations
  •  Florists
  • Shops at transport stations
  • Smaller convenience stores, provided that they meet the criteria set out in the law

In a strange quirk on Spanish legislation, commercial establishments smaller than 300 square metres have total freedom of trading schedules across Spain, regardless of what is says on their regional statute book. Tourist areas Tourist areas are often given exceptions to deal with demand. Shops in towns and areas declared as tourist-based are allowed to open every Sunday. That grouping, as of a few years ago, includes:

  • Downtown Madrid
  • Valencia municipality 
  • Zaragoza 
  • Downtown Palma de Mallorca 
  • Most of the Catalan coastal with the exception of Barcelona
  • Most of the Murcia’s coastal area
  • The Andalusian and Valencian coastal areas

Equally, any area with a World Heritage Site or property of cultural or national interest is allowed to open, as are shops close to ports on tourist cruise routes, and areas whose main attraction is shopping tourism. Are Supermarkets Open On Sunday In Spain A woman walks past a closed shop in Madrid. Photo: GABRIEL BOUYS / AFP) READ MORE: Are Spaniards really that bad at queueing?  Community rules Businesses that are not included in the exempted sectors outlined in national law, as above, must abide by the trading calendar outlined every year by their regional government.

This means that many businesses aren’t able to open on Sundays, even if they wanted to. Certain sectors, however, like hospitality, can open without restrictions, as can pharmacies. This means there’s quite a bit of variation in Sunday trading laws around Spain.

In Madrid, for example, all businesses have been able to open, if they wish, for 24 hours a day, 365 days a week, since 2021. Compare that with the stricter restrictions in Basque Country, for example, where no big business can open on Sundays, nor holidays, and are often closed on Saturday afternoons too.

  • Generally speaking, the number of Sundays autonomous communities can play with is sixteen spread throughout the calendar years;
  • However, based on each region’s unique economic circumstances, the number of authorised Sunday openings can be tinkered with, whether by increasing or decreasing it;

You can usually find your region’s Sunday opening scheduled for the whole year online. The economic impact The COVID-19 pandemic shutdown sparked debate about the economic consequences of Spain’s Sunday trading laws. Business groups called on the government to relax some of the restrictions when faced with financial annihilation, and requested freedom to open when they please, as was allowed in the aftermath of the 2008 financial crisis.

  1. With many businesses having closed their doors for the last time during the pandemic, allowing more economic freedom to trade on Sundays is seen as a way of recouping the significant losses many endured during the lockdown;
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It would also perhaps be a way to boost employment, although many smaller businesses claim they can’t open on Sundays because they can’t afford to hire new staff or pay their existing workers more money. Smaller businesses and self-employed unions are often at loggerheads over Sunday trading laws with bigger companies and corporations, represented by The National Association of Large Distribution Companies (Anged), with regards to competition and the pros and cons of more liberal trading hours.

Is Carrefour Spain open on Sunday?

Carrefour – Carrefour is normally open on Sundays and public holidays, but some Carrefour supermarkets do have reduced opening hours on these days while others are closed. The best advice is to check the opening times of your local Carrefour for this May bank holiday weekend 2022.

Are shops closed in Seville on Sunday?

Opening hours – Most shops in Seville open at 0930 or 1000, closing at 1330 or 1400 for siesta and reopening at 1700 until 2000 on weekdays. On Saturdays they generally only open for half a day and on Sunday remain closed, but several bigger stores stay open all day, including Saturdays.

Are Tabacs Open on Sunday in Spain?

Page Content – Q: Can you let me know if any of the tobacco shops “tabac shops” around the Ramblas selling cigarettes that will be open on Sundays. Also will the tobacco shops be open around the Christmas period? A: The La Rambla is one of the most famous places for tourists in Barcelona to visit.

That means that it is one of the places where you will find most shops open. In general, the opening hours for shops in Barcelona may vary a little. They typically open at 09:00 or 10:00 and close at 20:30 or 21:00.

Tobacco shops follow the same rules as normal shops.

La Rambla in Barcelona

However for kiosks on Las Ramblas, the opening hours vary more than for shops in other areas of the city. In general, many of the newspaper kiosks that also sell cigarettes at the Ramblas open almost every day of the year. Some even open 24 hours a day every day. Though, this depends on the general situation, as several of the kiosk owners told me. They may change their opening hours during the months when there are fewer tourists visiting the city.

Kiosks along La Rambla street in Barcelona

In general, during the peak season the newspaper kiosks actually on La Rambla usually open until late and even on Sundays. Other shops also on La Rambla follow the same rules e. you will find pharmacies that open 24 hours a day or a book shop that opens on Sundays during the morning from 08:00 – 14:00. If you are looking to buy cigarettes in bulk then it is recommended you buy them from a specialist Tabac shop as opposed to a newspaper kiosk because the prices are likely to be much more competitive.

The hours mentioned are valid for the kiosks and also for many of the souvenirs shops. I found one Tobacco shop (Tabac in Catalan) that probably will open on Sunday 24 December however he could not confirm for sure.

The owner told me to call in advance to make sure, but usually they open on Sundays around Christmas. You will find the contact details below: Gimeno Ramblas – Tabacs, Regals, Articles Fumador La Rambla, 100 08002 Barcelona, España. Tel:  +34 93 318 4947 / +34 93 302 0983 Website: Gimeno Tabacs The other Tobacco shops selling cigarettes said they do not open on Sundays.

  1. There is a good Tabac shop just a few yards off La Rambla on Carrer de Sant Pau that has a wide collection of cigarettes and tobacco products;
  2. The nearest Metro is Liceu;
  3. In general, big shops or department stores like Corte Inglés open the two Sundays proceeding Christmas, they also sell cigarettes in the basement supermarket;

However, if you are looking to buy cigarettes in bulk, then the best places are most definitely the specialist Tabacs shops as they generally have the lowest prices for cigarettes over normal shops and the widest selection of brands. You will find information about opening hours on Sundays around the Ramblas area and general shopping information and tips by visiting this page: Barcelona general opening hours on Sundays.

What time do Spaniards go to bed?

‘ A quien madruga, Díos le ayuda ‘ is how Spaniards say ‘ Early to bed, early to rise, makes a man healthy, wealthy and wise ‘, and, while many Spaniards are indeed early risers, going to bed early is not a characteristic they are noted for. And the reason? Basically, Spaniards have been living in the wrong time zone for over 70 years and are doing everything, including going to bed, about an hour after they really ought to! Even though Spain is on the same longitude as Britain, Portugal and Morocco, Spaniards are on Central European Time (CET) and not Greenwich Mean Time (GMT), like the British, the Portuguese and the Moroccans.

This means that when it’s 11pm and body clocks think it’s time to hit the sack in London, Lisbon and Rabat, Spaniards going to bed at the exact same time find it’s already midnight in Madrid. But it hasn’t always been so.

In fact, Spaniards were living in the same geographic time zone as Londoners until 1940, when General Franco changed the country to CET to synchronise with the German economy. As a result, Spaniards who would eat at 1pm or 1. 30pm continued to eat at their usual time (now 2pm or 2.

  1. 30pm), continued to have dinner at 8pm (now 9pm) and continued to go to bed at 11pm (now midnight);
  2. However, they now had to be at work by 8am (because that time was now called 9am);
  3. With such early starts and late finishes to their days, is it any wonder that Spaniards have a longer lunch break with enough time for lunch AND a short nap? Of course, as a modern European trading nation, Spain is now reconsidering these long lunch breaks;

How much international business is lost when German, British or Dutch buyers phone Spanish suppliers mid-afternoon and get no answer?  The Spanish government is considering introducing ‘ jornada continua ‘ (continuous working day) with more standard European working hours and possibly a return to GMT.

  • However, not everyone likes the idea;
  • After 70 years, habits could be hard to change and the government is meeting opposition from lobby groups representing the tourist industry, among others;
  • On the other hand, The National Commission for the Rationalization of Spanish Working Hours ( La Comisión Nacional para la Racionalización de los Horarios Españoles ) insists that a return to GMT would mean that sunrise would be an hour earlier, meal times would be an hour earlier and Spaniards would get an extra hour’s sleep;

The debate rages on.

Why is dinner so late in Spain?

You could happily spend all day eating and drinking wherever you are in Spain , and I frequently do. One thing just sort of slides into the next – if you’re doing it right. Be warned though, this means resetting your eating routine and having your lunch and dinner at least an hour or two later than you might be used to.

  1. This means lunch sometime after 2pm and dinner at 9pm at the very earliest, although after 10pm is much more the norm;
  2. But why do the Spanish eat so late? When the sun is highest in the sky in Spain, it is not noon but 1;
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30pm. If you measure mealtimes according to the position of the sun, rather than what it is says on the clock, Spaniards are having their lunch at more or less the same times as the rest of Europe. Dinner, about seven hours later, matches their European counterparts too.

So why are the clocks out of synch? Well, until 1942, Spain was on Greenwich Mean Time, the same as the UK. But then General Franco, in his dubious wisdom, decided to put the country’s clocks forward an hour in line with Germany, Central European Time (CET), or GMT+1.

After the end of Second World War however, Spain stayed on CET. If you look at its geographic location, Spain is in the GMT zone. The Greenwich meridian passes through Castellón, on the east coast, so the vast majority of the country is west of it – as is Portugal, the Canary Islands and the UK, which are of course all on GMT.

  1. Galicia, in the northwestern corner of Spain, is so far west that really it should be in the next timezone, GMT-1;
  2. Another factor influencing the late eating times is that in the years of poverty that followed the Spanish Civil War in the 1940s and 1950s, a lot of people had two jobs: one from early morning until two o’clock, and another from late afternoon until late evening, so they had to fit their meals in around their long working hours;

There is an increasing demand to get Spain back on GMT, but the shift in routine would require other changes too. The main news bulletins, for example, are at nine in the evening and popular programmes such as soaps and reality shows, don’t even start until about 10.

15pm and go on until at least 11. 30pm. Shops are open until at least 8pm and so are a lot of museums. Although some businesses, particularly multinational companies, now only give an hour or less for lunch, many others allow two hours or more and many people in all sorts of occupations then have to go back to work until 7pm at least.

Nevertheless, whatever their working hours or daily routines, the Spanish people can always find time to eat. Of course, they are not all eating all day, every day, but sometimes it certainly looks that way. Strangely, however, they are in general less rotund than we are in the UK.

Are restaurants closed on Sundays in Spain?

In any case you’ll ALWAYS find restaurants open any day of the week. ) Sunday is the day off for shops with some exceptions : kiosks, bakeries, patisseries and some convenience stores are open Sun morning until 2pm, same for souvenir shops.

Does Madrid shut down on Sundays?

Sundays in Madrid FAQs – Are shops and restaurants closed in Madrid on Sundays? The overwhelming majority of bars and restaurants open on Sundays in Madrid. Weekends are peak days, so many eateries opt to take one of the less-busy weekdays off instead.

  • As far as grocery stores and other shops go, it depends;
  • Generally speaking, the closer you are to the center, the more likely you’ll be to find places open on Sundays;
  • Most supermarkets and many shops in central neighborhoods do open on Sundays, as well as all locations of the El Corte Inglés department store;

What market is held every Sunday in Madrid? The most famous Sunday market in Madrid is El Rastro, a massive open-air shopping extravaganza that takes place in the La Latina neighborhood. However, there are plenty of other Sunday markets in Madrid , so you’re sure to find one nearby no matter where in the city you are.

Are things closed in Barcelona on Sunday?

Shops are closed Sundays – Most Barcelona shops are closed on Sundays except some Sundays in July and August and some special shopping Sundays around Christmas. So if you are on a weekend trip to Barcelona, then a good tip is to plan your shopping on Saturday and sightseeing on Sunday.

See Barcelona shopping guide. On Sundays only souvenir shops, restaurants, cafes, bars and tourist attractions are open in Barcelona, except for July and August when some big shops and mall open on some Sundays.

For the rest of the year shopping centres and regular shops are closed on Sunday. You can find most of the top brands designer shops in Barcelona. See list of Barcelona designer stores. The most exclusive designer brands are on the elegant shopping streets  Passeig de Gracia and Avenida Diagonal and there are several big  shopping malls in Barcelona.

The most central department store is El Corte Ingles on Plaza Catalunya. Small shops close for a couple of hours for lunch. Big stores and malls are open all day and close around 8pm except shopping malls and departments stores which generally close at 10pm.

Shopping outlets mall  La Roca Village 1 hour north is open on Sundays. Maremagnum mall in Barcelona harbour area is always open on Sundays. Barcelona Shopping Guide Shopping malls Barcelona Outlet malls Barcelona.

What time is Lidl Open in Spain?

Supermarkets DIA   – The store chain DIA uses a schedule from 9:00 am to 9:30 pm in the majority of its branches. In Madrid, the store is in many cases open longer, from 8. 00 am to 8. 30 am, and closes between 9. 30 pm and 10. 00 pm. To know exactly what the opening and closing times are of the store you want to go to, it is best to look in your search engine on the website.

The holidays on which the company closes also differ per location. In any case, the national holidays are also observed here and the doors are closed. The DIA customer service number is 912 170 453. Another handy and quick way to find out the opening times of the supermarkets you always go to is by searching the name of the supermarket and the location on Google.

The location with links to the website, the route, the telephone number, and the current opening hours will appear on the right of your screen as a service from Google.

What time do the shops close in Spain?

The opening hours for most shops throughout the country are from 9:30 a. to 2 p. and from 5 p. to 8 p. , Monday to Saturday. From 2 p. to 5p. shops are closed for the famous Spanish ‘siesta’.

Does Barcelona shut down on Sunday?

Shops are closed Sundays – Most Barcelona shops are closed on Sundays except some Sundays in July and August and some special shopping Sundays around Christmas. So if you are on a weekend trip to Barcelona, then a good tip is to plan your shopping on Saturday and sightseeing on Sunday.

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See Barcelona shopping guide. On Sundays only souvenir shops, restaurants, cafes, bars and tourist attractions are open in Barcelona, except for July and August when some big shops and mall open on some Sundays.

For the rest of the year shopping centres and regular shops are closed on Sunday. You can find most of the top brands designer shops in Barcelona. See list of Barcelona designer stores. The most exclusive designer brands are on the elegant shopping streets  Passeig de Gracia and Avenida Diagonal and there are several big  shopping malls in Barcelona.

The most central department store is El Corte Ingles on Plaza Catalunya. Small shops close for a couple of hours for lunch. Big stores and malls are open all day and close around 8pm except shopping malls and departments stores which generally close at 10pm.

Shopping outlets mall  La Roca Village 1 hour north is open on Sundays. Maremagnum mall in Barcelona harbour area is always open on Sundays. Barcelona Shopping Guide Shopping malls Barcelona Outlet malls Barcelona.

What times are shops open in Spain?

The opening hours for most shops throughout the country are from 9:30 a. to 2 p. and from 5 p. to 8 p. , Monday to Saturday. From 2 p. to 5p. shops are closed for the famous Spanish ‘siesta’.

Is Seville open on Sundays?

Sundays in Seville are like no place I have ever been. Every shop, store and business is closed. The only places open are cafes, restaurants and bars and people are everywhere. Sundays are a day for people to get outside, roam the streets and have long conversations with friends over tapas, beer and wine.

Last Sunday I had a general plan to stay in, do homework and study. Then I looked outside. It was a perfectly cloudless day, the sun shone brightly as a cool breeze blew through the streets. As November begins, bringing cold weather and rain, I realized that these beautiful days might be in short supply.

Over the next month, I am traveling through Europe almost every weekend. So, since it was my last weekend in Seville until the end of November, I decided to enjoy the day in my study abroad city.

 Parade in front of Tiendas del Centro

By midday the streets were packed with people. Walking to the main shopping center, Tiendas del Centro, I came across a parade. The street was closed off as a marching band made its way between the crowds. Children held pastel balloons, dancing and running around excitedly. I made my way to the cathedral passing by two street performers, one playing violin and the other cello.

Are Supermarkets Open On Sunday In Spain
 Plaza del Cabildo

Across from the Catedral de Sevilla is a hidden plaza, Plaza del Cabildo. A semi-circular building surrounds the  plaza, with a fountain along one wall and a shaded pathway with columns following the curve of the building. On Sundays, there is a collectors market with old coins, stamps and antiques. Collectors of all ages stooped over tables brimming with trinkets and shiny objects.

Away from the packed parade, the soft calm music felt like another world. More people stood around the two in stunned silence, enjoying the peace. Winding my way back toward my casa, I came across an art fair in the middle of another plaza.

Paintings, drawings and murals lined the square shaded by tall green trees and people wandering in between the canvases.

Are Supermarkets Open On Sunday In Spain
 Art Fair

At 3pm, after eating lunch at an Italian restaurant in a quiet square in the middle of the shopping center, two of my roommates and I hit the streets again. We had no specific location in mind, but roamed along winding cobblestoned streets. When we came across a fork in the road, we chose at random, letting the streets guide us. By this time, the crowds from the events of the morning had dissipated. The narrow streets were void of people, while the cafés and bars were packed.

Without realizing it, we made a full circle, getting lost and at the same time knowing exactly where we were. At the end of our journey we stopped for ice cream and a break from the warm sun before heading home.

I have been in studying abroad in Seville  for almost two months, yet I am in awe of this magical city everyday. Kaleigh Shufeldt is the Fall 2014 CEA Mojo in Seville, Spain. She is currently a senior at the University of Arizona.

Why is dinner so late in Spain?

You could happily spend all day eating and drinking wherever you are in Spain , and I frequently do. One thing just sort of slides into the next – if you’re doing it right. Be warned though, this means resetting your eating routine and having your lunch and dinner at least an hour or two later than you might be used to.

This means lunch sometime after 2pm and dinner at 9pm at the very earliest, although after 10pm is much more the norm. But why do the Spanish eat so late? When the sun is highest in the sky in Spain, it is not noon but 1.

30pm. If you measure mealtimes according to the position of the sun, rather than what it is says on the clock, Spaniards are having their lunch at more or less the same times as the rest of Europe. Dinner, about seven hours later, matches their European counterparts too.

So why are the clocks out of synch? Well, until 1942, Spain was on Greenwich Mean Time, the same as the UK. But then General Franco, in his dubious wisdom, decided to put the country’s clocks forward an hour in line with Germany, Central European Time (CET), or GMT+1.

After the end of Second World War however, Spain stayed on CET. If you look at its geographic location, Spain is in the GMT zone. The Greenwich meridian passes through Castellón, on the east coast, so the vast majority of the country is west of it – as is Portugal, the Canary Islands and the UK, which are of course all on GMT.

  1. Galicia, in the northwestern corner of Spain, is so far west that really it should be in the next timezone, GMT-1;
  2. Another factor influencing the late eating times is that in the years of poverty that followed the Spanish Civil War in the 1940s and 1950s, a lot of people had two jobs: one from early morning until two o’clock, and another from late afternoon until late evening, so they had to fit their meals in around their long working hours;

There is an increasing demand to get Spain back on GMT, but the shift in routine would require other changes too. The main news bulletins, for example, are at nine in the evening and popular programmes such as soaps and reality shows, don’t even start until about 10.

15pm and go on until at least 11. 30pm. Shops are open until at least 8pm and so are a lot of museums. Although some businesses, particularly multinational companies, now only give an hour or less for lunch, many others allow two hours or more and many people in all sorts of occupations then have to go back to work until 7pm at least.

Nevertheless, whatever their working hours or daily routines, the Spanish people can always find time to eat. Of course, they are not all eating all day, every day, but sometimes it certainly looks that way. Strangely, however, they are in general less rotund than we are in the UK.