Does Spain Drive On The Right Side?

Does Spain Drive On The Right Side
Driving in Spain FAQs –

  • Can I drive my car in Spain? Yes. You must have a valid UK licence and V5 document, along with sufficient insurance and breakdown cover for your trip. You should also familiarise yourself with the laws around driving in Spain before you set off to keep yourself and other road users safe.
  • How do I drive to Spain? Getting to Spain by car from the UK is probably easier than you think. Firstly, you’ll need to take your car across the Channel to Calais on either a ferry from Dover or the Eurotunnel from Folkestone. Once you’re in Calais, drive down through France and across the border into Spain, which should take around 10 hours. Alternatively, you can take a ferry from Plymouth or Portsmouth to the northern Spanish cities of Bilbao and Santander.
  • What side of the road do they drive on in Spain? Unlike in the UK, motorists drive on the right-hand side of the road in Spain and overtake on the left – which can take some adjustment if you’re used to driving on the left.
  • Can you drive in Spain with a UK licence? Yes, you can legally drive in Spain with your UK-issued driving licence without the need to apply for an International Driving Permit.
  • Do I need extra insurance to drive in Spain? Spain and the UK are both part of the Green Card System, a Europe-wide scheme allowing all countries to recognise foreign vehicle insurance policies of visiting motorists, so it’s quite possible your existing insurance will cover you. However, before setting off on your trip, you should contact your insurance provider to make sure that no additional cover is required, as you won’t be able to buy short-term cover at the border entry points.
  • Is driving in Spain dangerous? Driving in Spain is generally very easy once you get used to driving on the right side of the road. All main roads are in good condition and well signposted, and the toll motorways are very quiet. Be careful if you go off the beaten track, however, as the quality of the roads and signage can vary considerably.
  • Do I need a GB/UK sticker to drive in Spain? You will need to display a UK sticker on the rear of your car. GB stickers have been discontinued.
  • Do I need headlamp converters in Spain? Yes. Depending on your car, you will either need deflector stickers or have to adjust the beam manually. This is so you don’t dazzle oncoming traffic when driving on the right side of the road at night.
  • What is the national speed limit in Spain? The national speed limit on Spanish motorways is 120km/h (75 mph). If you’re driving on a main road outside a built-up area, the limit is 90km/h, and for built-up areas it’s 50km/h.
  • Do I need snow chains in Spain? Although Spain is known for its sunny climate, it does snow in some areas. In certain circumstances, particularly on mountain passes, the use of snow chains or winter tyres may become compulsory.
  • How much are toll roads in Spain? The amount you pay per toll will depend on the length of the road and the area you’re driving in. Visit https://www. viamichelin. com to calculate the cost of your journey.
  • How do you pay for toll roads in Spain? There are two ways to pay for tolls – electronically or manually. On most toll roads, you take a ticket when you enter the motorway and pay when you exit at a booth with a green arrow. Simply insert your ticket into the machine and it will show you how much you need to pay. You can either pay by cash or credit card. If you regularly use toll roads, it’s worth signing up to the Telepeaje scheme which takes you through the fast lane without having to stop and pay.
  • Does Spain use mph or kph? Spain uses the metric system for all road signs, so speed limits and other signs including distance are shown in kilometres and metres.
  • Is it compulsory to carry a spare wheel in Spain? For Spanish residents, a spare tyre or puncture repair kit must be carried in the vehicle, but if your car is registered outside Spain this is not obligatory. You should, however, make sure you check all your tyres before setting off. The legal minimum depth of tyre tread is 1. 6mm for the full circumference of the tyre.

Which countries drive on the right?

What side is the steering wheel in Spain?

Level Contributor 34 posts 3 reviews 1 helpful vote Driving in Spain 12 years ago Hello! Can someone please advise if the car’s steering wheel is on the right-side or left side in Spain ? I will be visiting from North America and am wondering if it will easy for me to drive in Spain. Thanks. Report inappropriate content Level Contributor 9,278 posts 14 reviews 36 helpful votes 1. Re: Driving in Spain 12 years ago The steering wheel is on the same side of the car as it is in North America. We drive on the right side of the road, and pass on the left. Report inappropriate content Level Contributor 83,163 posts 3,805 reviews 3,541 helpful votes 2. Re: Driving in Spain 12 years ago Safura: Look at the top questions for the driving guide. Report inappropriate content 3. Re: Driving in Spain 11 years ago Get answers to your questions about Spain.

Why do British drive on the left?

Have you ever wondered why the British drive on the left? There is an historical reason for this; it’s all to do with keeping your sword hand free! In the Middle Ages you never knew who you were going to meet when travelling on horseback. Most people are right-handed, so if a stranger passed by on the right of you, your right hand would be free to use your sword if required. (Similarly, medieval castle staircases spiral in a clockwise direction going upwards, so the defending soldiers would be able to stab down around the twist but those attacking (going up the stairs) would not.

  • ) Indeed the ‘keep to the left’ rule goes back even further in time; archaeologists have discovered evidence suggesting that the Romans drove carts and wagons on the left, and it is known that Roman soldiers always marched on the left;
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This ‘rule of the road’ was officially sanctioned in 1300 AD when Pope Boniface VIII declared that all pilgrims travelling to Rome should keep to the left. Does Spain Drive On The Right Side This continued until the late 1700s when large wagons became popular for transporting goods. These wagons were drawn by several pairs of horses and had no driver’s seat. Instead, in order to control the horses, the driver sat on the horse at the back left, thus keeping his whip hand free. Sitting on the left however made it difficult to judge the traffic coming the other way, as anyone who has driven a left-hand drive car along the winding lanes of Britain will agree! These huge wagons were best suited to the wide open spaces and large distances of Canada and the US, and the first keep-to-the-right law was passed in Pennsylvania in 1792, with many Canadian and US states following suit later.

In France a decree of 1792 ordered traffic to keep to the “common” right and Napoleon later enforced the rule in all French territories. In Britain there wasn’t much call for these massive wagons and the smaller British vehicles had seats for the driver to sit on behind the horses.

As most people are right-handed, the driver would sit to the right of the seat so his whip hand was free. Traffic congestion in 18th century London led to a law being passed to make all traffic on London Bridge keep to the left in order to reduce collisions. Does Spain Drive On The Right Side There was a movement in the 20th century towards the harmonisation of road laws in Europe and a gradual shift began from driving on the left to the right. The last Europeans to change from left to right were the Swedes who bravely made the change overnight on Dagen H (H Day), September 3rd 1967. At 4. 50am all traffic in Sweden stopped for ten minutes before restarting, this time driving on the right. Today, only 35% of countries drive on the left.

This rule was incorporated into the Highway Act of 1835 and was adopted throughout the British Empire. These include India, Indonesia, Ireland, Malta, Cyprus, Japan, New Zealand, Australia and most recently, Samoa in 2009.

Most of these countries are islands but where land borders require a change from left to right, this is usually accomplished using traffic lights, cross-over bridges, one-way systems or similar.

Is driving easy in Spain?

Driving in Spain FAQs –

  • Can I drive my car in Spain? Yes. You must have a valid UK licence and V5 document, along with sufficient insurance and breakdown cover for your trip. You should also familiarise yourself with the laws around driving in Spain before you set off to keep yourself and other road users safe.
  • How do I drive to Spain? Getting to Spain by car from the UK is probably easier than you think. Firstly, you’ll need to take your car across the Channel to Calais on either a ferry from Dover or the Eurotunnel from Folkestone. Once you’re in Calais, drive down through France and across the border into Spain, which should take around 10 hours. Alternatively, you can take a ferry from Plymouth or Portsmouth to the northern Spanish cities of Bilbao and Santander.
  • What side of the road do they drive on in Spain? Unlike in the UK, motorists drive on the right-hand side of the road in Spain and overtake on the left – which can take some adjustment if you’re used to driving on the left.
  • Can you drive in Spain with a UK licence? Yes, you can legally drive in Spain with your UK-issued driving licence without the need to apply for an International Driving Permit.
  • Do I need extra insurance to drive in Spain? Spain and the UK are both part of the Green Card System, a Europe-wide scheme allowing all countries to recognise foreign vehicle insurance policies of visiting motorists, so it’s quite possible your existing insurance will cover you. However, before setting off on your trip, you should contact your insurance provider to make sure that no additional cover is required, as you won’t be able to buy short-term cover at the border entry points.
  • Is driving in Spain dangerous? Driving in Spain is generally very easy once you get used to driving on the right side of the road. All main roads are in good condition and well signposted, and the toll motorways are very quiet. Be careful if you go off the beaten track, however, as the quality of the roads and signage can vary considerably.
  • Do I need a GB/UK sticker to drive in Spain? You will need to display a UK sticker on the rear of your car. GB stickers have been discontinued.
  • Do I need headlamp converters in Spain? Yes. Depending on your car, you will either need deflector stickers or have to adjust the beam manually. This is so you don’t dazzle oncoming traffic when driving on the right side of the road at night.
  • What is the national speed limit in Spain? The national speed limit on Spanish motorways is 120km/h (75 mph). If you’re driving on a main road outside a built-up area, the limit is 90km/h, and for built-up areas it’s 50km/h.
  • Do I need snow chains in Spain? Although Spain is known for its sunny climate, it does snow in some areas. In certain circumstances, particularly on mountain passes, the use of snow chains or winter tyres may become compulsory.
  • How much are toll roads in Spain? The amount you pay per toll will depend on the length of the road and the area you’re driving in. Visit https://www. viamichelin. com to calculate the cost of your journey.
  • How do you pay for toll roads in Spain? There are two ways to pay for tolls – electronically or manually. On most toll roads, you take a ticket when you enter the motorway and pay when you exit at a booth with a green arrow. Simply insert your ticket into the machine and it will show you how much you need to pay. You can either pay by cash or credit card. If you regularly use toll roads, it’s worth signing up to the Telepeaje scheme which takes you through the fast lane without having to stop and pay.
  • Does Spain use mph or kph? Spain uses the metric system for all road signs, so speed limits and other signs including distance are shown in kilometres and metres.
  • Is it compulsory to carry a spare wheel in Spain? For Spanish residents, a spare tyre or puncture repair kit must be carried in the vehicle, but if your car is registered outside Spain this is not obligatory. You should, however, make sure you check all your tyres before setting off. The legal minimum depth of tyre tread is 1. 6mm for the full circumference of the tyre.
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Can UK drivers drive in Spain?

Spain (including Balearic and Canary Isles) – You can continue to use your licence until 30 April 2022. You may need to take a test if you want to exchange your licence. If you hold a licence from Gibraltar, Jersey, Guernsey or the Isle of Man, you may need to take a test to drive in Spain.

Is it cheaper to drive or fly to Spain?

How long does it take? How much does it cost? – We decided to travel to Spain by car because there were severe air travel disruptions this year due to the the volcanic ash cloud created from a sub-glacial volcano in Iceland. The volcano Eyjafjallajokull in Iceland began erupting in March and on the 14th April 2010 the eruption entered a new explosive phase which brought the European airspace to a standstill and caused misery to many hundreds of thousands of travellers.

This is when we started thinking about documenting an alternative travel to our favourite destination of Alicante. We have driven to Alicante before but we hadn’t documented it as we didn’t have our website up at that time.

So here it is – how we travelled to Spain by car from the UK (Hertfordshire). We’ll compare prices of a fly drive to just driving to Spain including the extra costs of diesel/petrol, hotel, food and tolls etc. Spain by Car – the route. View Larger Map We left Hertfordshire and travelled to Folkstone and caught the Eurotunnel to Calais. From Calais we drove through France, via Paris (in the rush hour – not a good idea!) The N1 leading into Paris and out of Paris (depending on which way you are travelling!) is horrendous at the moment. A tram line is being built and the whole of the road seems to have been dug up. On the way to Spain we were stuck in the morning rush hour traffic for an hour and a half. On the return journey we hit this road late morning and it was much quicker but still frustrating. Just to warn you! From Paris we continued down through France on the A10, A71 and A75. We stopped at Millau in Southern France and stayed overnight at a Hotel. You can read our Citotel Jalade review. We took some time to see the amazing Millau Bridge in the morning. Then we were back on the road to Spain. From Milau we got back on the A75. We missed our exit for D13 and ended up having to take a slight detour through some farmland and into a lovely town called Nezignan-l’Eveque and we stopped right by a restaurant called The Saint Alban! (we are from St Albans) From D13 we took the A9 and went through the French / Spanish border. Leaving France Behind – Through Passport Control at the France / Spain border and into Spain. We continued our Spain by Car journey by travelling all the way on the Autopista del Meditarani AP7 past Barcelona, past Tarragona. Past Valencia then we exited at Junction 65 for La Nucia. Spain by Car – the timings We left St Albans Hertfordshire at 1. 00 a.

  1. on Thursday 5th August and we arrived in La Nucia Spain on August 6th 2010 at 20;
  2. 30;
  3. We had driven a total mileage of 1,240 miles and were on the road for 21 hours;
  4. We passed through 8 tolls (but we missed the tolls on the Millau Bridge)and filled the tank up once on the journey;

We made a number of service stops but didn’t keep a count of how many! Spain by Car – Journey summary Costs (Currency rate was approx 1 to 1. 2 euros at time of travelling) Eurotunnel 70 Total Cost in tolls outward journey- 116. 35 euros / 97 (53. 50 euros in France 63.

85 in Spain) Hotel Room – 80 euros / 67 Diesel – we used one and a half tanks of diesel (diesel cost in Millau 1. 062 per litre). 90 Food – 100 Total on outward journey 420 Return Journey Spain to the UK by Car Eurotunnel 85 Tolls on return journey 122,95 euros / 102 (was more expensive because this time we used the Millau Bridge tolls).

Hotel rooms 196,40 euros / 164 Diesel 90 Food 100 Total – 555 Total Cost 975 Miles Driven to Spain by car St Albans to Folkstone – 96 miles Folkstone to Millau – 584 miles Millau to La Nucia 720 miles Total Miles 1,400 miles You can click on the links above to find out more information about different stages of the journey.

Cheaper to Drive or Cheaper to Fly? Flights with Easyjet from London Luton to Alicante would have been 1,147 for all four of us. Car Hire for 7 days would have been 115 (For the cheapest possible car. This does not take into account any insurance or child seat hire or the fact that it has the capacity to take 2 standard suitcases !).

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Bringing this to a total of 1262 to fly. Driving saved us 287 Summary It is evident that it is cheaper to travel to Spain by car than it is to fly. We could have made it even cheaper by camping rather than staying at hotels. It does however take a lot out of you.

It can be boring, monotamous and very tiring. You need to be extremely organised and the journey needs to be well planned in advance. But on the positive side you get to see so much of France and Spain that you would otherwise miss.

If we hadn’t have driven would we ever have got to see the awe inspiring technology that is the Millau Bridge? Would we have experienced a French Festival in Beziers? Got lost in a French Vineyard? Been terrified on the Paris roads? The answer to that is that ‘no we wouldn’t have’.

Why did the US decide to drive on the right?

by Richard F. Weingroff The Federal Highway Administration has often been asked about the American practice of driving on the right, instead of the left, as in Great Britain, our “Mother Country. ” Albert C. Rose, who served as “unofficial historian” of the U.

Bureau of Public Roads during much of his long career with the agency (1919-1950) researched why. Rose found that, “All available evidence seems to indicate that the RIGHT-HAND travel predominated in Colonial America from the time of the earliest settlements.

” The ox-team, the horseback rider, the handler of the lead horse, and even the pedestrian all traveled to the right. Travelers with hand guns carried their weapons in the hollows of their left arms and traveled to the right, the better to be ready if an oncoming stranger proved dangerous: When wagons came into general use, they were hauled by two, four or six horses and the driver rode the left rear (wheel) horse like the Old World position.

Handling the reins or jerk line with the left hand [and] the long black-snake whip with the right, these drivers traveled to the right so as to watch more closely the clearance at the left. The heavy Conestoga wagons introduced about 1750, in the vicinity of Lancaster, Pa.

, gave an added impetus to right-hand travel. The drivers rode the left wheel horse, postilion fashion, or rode the “lazy board” at the left side of the wagon, or walked along the road at the left side of the horses. He also noted a “smoldering opposition to customs of the Old World.

” Thus no valid reason existed for transplanting the English left-hand rule especially since the nationals of other European countries had established in America widely separated settlements in which their own customs were observed.

Australian historian M. Lay agreed with Rose that the Conestoga wagon provided a “major impetus for right-hand driving in the United States”: The wagon was operated either by the postilion driver riding the left-hand near horse-called the wheel horse-or by the driver walking or sitting on a “lazy board” on the left-hand side of the vehicle.

He kept to the left in both cases in order to use the right hand to manage the horses and operate the brake lever mounted on the left-hand side. Passing therefore required moving to the right to give the driver forward vision.

Rose found that no formal rule of the road was adopted by the new country or any State until 1792. In that year, Pennsylvania adopted legislation to establish a turnpike from Lancaster to Philadelphia. The charter legislation provided that travel would be on the right hand side of the turnpike.

New York, in 1804, became the first State to prescribe right hand travel on all public highways. By the Civil War, right hand travel was followed in every State. Drivers tended to sit on the right so they could ensure their buggy, wagon, or other vehicle didn’t run into a roadside ditch.

Lay also emphasized the ditches as an influence: With the growth of traffic, the roadside ditches also led to a growing tendency in the United States in the late nineteenth century for drivers of light horse-drawn vehicles to both drive on the right and sit on the right to avoid the greater evil of the ditch.

It was also common practice with bench-seated drivers of single-line horse drawn carriages, where the need to accommodate the whip in the right hand predominated. When inventors began building “automobiles” in the 1890’s, they thought of them as motorized wagons.

As a result, many early cars had the steering mechanism-a rudder (or tiller), not a wheel-in the center position where the side of the road didn’t make any difference. Lay points out that technical innovation created the configuration we are familiar with in the United States: However, with the introduction of the steering wheel in 1898, a central location was no longer technically possible.

Car makers usually copied existing practice and placed the driver on the curbside. Thus, most American cars produced before 1910 were made with right-side driver seating, although intended for right-side driving.

Such vehicles remained in common use until 1915, and the 1908 Model T was the first of Ford’s cars to feature a left-side driving position. By 1915, the Model T had become so popular that the rest of the automakers followed Ford’s lead. Lay traced the first regulation of one-side-or-the-other to the Chinese bureaucracy of 1100 B.

The Book of Rites stated: “The right side of the road is for men, the left side for women and the center for carriages. ” This Western Zhou dynasty rule applied only to the dynasty’s wide official roads and was “more concerned with protocol than avoiding head-on collisions.

” Over 3,000 years later, Lay concluded, “there are no technical reasons for preferring driving on either the left or the right side of the road.