Law On Septic Tanks In Spain?

Law On Septic Tanks In Spain
SEPTIC TANKS AND WASTED WATER – In our recent article of 28/08/2012, we were introducing the new regulations which were affecting to the application, and to obtain, certificate of habitation in the VALENCIA REGION ( click here to read the article ).

Other areas like Murcia, or Andalusia, are not affected byt this nwew law. In this article we were considering the new requirements that the Spanish administration will request from properties in RUSTIC LAND to obtain the certificate of habitation.

One of the most important and positive points considered by the law is that, when in force, will open the way to old properties in RUSTIC LAND to obtain certificate of habitation (CH). Which is what not only our company, but the rest of legal specialists, and even jurisprudence of High Courts in Valencia and in Madrid was defending.

  • But, the Spanish administration (mainly Town Halls), will request to the owners of properties in process to obtain the CH the following, in RUSTIC LAND: – To inform to the Town Hall about the way in which the residual water of the property is treated;

– And, if the way in which the residual water is treated does not fulfil with the environmental laws, to adapt, or to install, a certified system (usually by septic tanks with depurating system). As this is a matter which will affect to sales, and to future transactions in the area, TLACORP staff  have been doing searches to obtain more information about the legal and technical requirements that will be considered in terms to fulfil with the new requirements which will enter in force when the new law is definitely approved.

Recently, we have obtained the following information which we wished to share with you: – How to know if you have really a septic tank, and that it is a certified one? Answer : Usually, the same tank installer  provides you with a certification confirming the system installed fulfils with the Environmental EC regulations.

– I do not have this certificate, how I know if my system is OK?:  Answer:  Contacting a specialized company. They will check the system (even with micro-cameras), and will confirm you if the installation fulfils the requirements or not. And then, if the installation is not ok, they will recommend you the way to sort it out.

  • –  I have an EC certified septic tank, but I do not know what to do with the water after filtering;
  • Can I spread it in the field, or use it as irrigation water?: Answer:  If you have a certified septic tank, you need a special permit from the Hydrographical Confederation of the area to use it as irrigation, or to spread it under the soil;

If you have not this permit, legally, you cannot spread the water in your land. –  I have a watertight deposit, and the water is not spread in my field. When the deposit is full, a company comes with the truck and empty the tank, bringing the water. Is this OK for the new law?.

  • Answer:  It will depend on the individual interpretation of the new law in each of the areas of influence;
  • It may happen that some Town Hall may accept this system, and others may request septic tank instead of watertight deposit;

Unfortunately, the only way to know this is wait till the law is definitely in force (we repeat that now is not more than a project), and the way in which the different local authorities interpret it. It is really important to say that the intention of this article is just to inform of the eventual and future developments of laws in the market.

What are the 2020 septic tank regulations?

Under the GBRs, anyone with a septic tank discharging into a watercourse must replace it or upgrade it by 1 January 2020, or sooner if the property is sold before this date, or if the Environment Agency (EA) finds that it is causing pollution.

What are the general binding rules for septic tanks?

Properties which are not connected to mains drainage, mainly in rural areas, will need to use a private system, most commonly a septic tank or a small sewage treatment plant. Changes to the regulations governing discharges from these systems have not been well-publicised; often it is not until a property is being sold that problems arise, as this is when drainage investigations are carried out.

So what are the current rules and why is it important that property owners and estate managers should be aware of them? Discharges to groundwater and surface waters (such as rivers) are regulated by the Environmental Permitting regime, under the Environmental Permitting (England and Wales) Regulations 2016 (EP Regulations 2016).

Small sewage discharges (SSDs) are regulated differently in England and Wales, but for the purpose of this alert we will focus on the rules as they apply in England. An environmental permit from the Environment Agency may be needed for the operation of the drainage system unless an exemption applies.

  1. The requirements for a SSD from a domestic property were simplified on 1 January 2015, with the introduction of the general binding rules with which discharges must comply to qualify for the exemption;

The general binding rules repeat and expand the requirements set out in the EP Regulations 2016, so it is important to read both carefully. A SSD of domestic sewage is exempt from the requirement to have an environmental permit, provided it meets a number of conditions including:

  • A general condition that it does not cause pollution of groundwater or surface water.
  • Volume threshold conditions which differ for discharges to surface and groundwater.
  • The discharge meets the location conditions in relation to sensitive and protected sites.

In order to benefit from the exemption, SSDs must not contain any trade effluent, but can include discharges from some small businesses, for example: small hotels, pubs, restaurants and offices. There are two sets of general binding rules which apply depending on whether the discharge is an existing discharge to groundwater or surface water (before 31 December 2014) or a new discharge from 1 January 2015. The rules contain a number of provisions including:

  • A new SSD can only be exempt if it cannot reasonably be discharged to the public sewer and for the exemption to apply, new discharges must not be within 30 metres of a public sewer.
  • A small sewage treatment plant must be used to treat the sewage if discharging to a surface water such as a river or stream.
  • Discharges from septic tanks directly to a surface water are not permitted. Septic tanks that discharge to surface waters must be replaced or upgraded as soon as possible; plans should be in place to carry out the work within a reasonable timescale, typically 12 months.
  • For discharge to a groundwater, septic tanks or small sewage treatment plants must be used to treat the sewage and then discharge the effluent (treated liquid) to ground via a drainage field.

When buying a residential property served by a septic tank or sewage package treatment plant specific enquiries must be made to ascertain whether the SSD qualifies for an exemption. Sellers are under an obligation to give the new owner a written notice stating that a SSD is being carried out and giving a description of the system and its maintenance requirements. The general binding rules stipulate that where properties with septic tanks that discharge directly to surface water are sold, responsibility for the replacement or upgrade of the existing treatment system should be addressed between the buyer and seller as a condition of sale.

This is because such a discharge does not satisfy the conditions for an exemption and is only allowed to continue where an existing environmental permit is in place. Responsibility for compliance rests with the “operator” of a SSD who is defined as the person who has control over the operation of the septic tank or sewage treatment plant.

This is not always easy to determine, as this can include someone who uses it even though the system itself (or part of it) is located on neighbouring land, or another person (such as a tenant) who agrees to be responsible for its operation and maintenance.

Owners and estate managers should ensure any systems are checked by a surveyor to confirm they can satisfy the criteria for the exemption, for example, the volume of discharge as well as ongoing maintenance inspections.

A septic tank will need to be upgraded or replaced if it does not meet the standards in the EP Regulations 2016 and if it does not qualify for an exemption, then an environment permit will be needed. The general binding rules may not be well-known, but as we have shown, you may well be bound by them, so do not get caught out.

Can you sell a house with non-compliant septic tank?

Buying/selling a property with a septic tank or sewage treatment plant – If a property you wish to buy still has a non-compliant waste management system, ask the seller whether they intend to replace or upgrade it—agree to this as a condition of sale.

  1. Alternatively, consider lowering your offer to make up for the future costs of improving it yourself;
  2. If you are selling the property, it is your responsibility to install a sewage treatment system compliant with the general binding rules;
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Being non-compliant will not only detract potential buyers but you may also be subject to enforcement action by the Environment Agency. You must also provide the following information to the buyer:

  • a description of the treatment plant and drainage system
  • the location of the main parts of the treatment plant, drainage system and discharge point
  • details of any changes made to the treatment plant and drainage system
  • details of how the treatment plant should be maintained, and the maintenance manual if you have one
  • maintenance records if you have them

Does a septic tank require building regulations?

The new septic tank will need to be installed in accordance with Building Regulations. If the new septic tank is replacing an existing system then Full Planning Permission may not be required, instead the work can be carried out under a Building Notice only, meeting the requirements of Building Regulations.

How do I know if my septic tank is compliant?

Environmental Permitting (England and Wales) (Amendment) (England) Regulations 2014 came into force on 1 January 2015 and created General Binding Rules (GBRs) for septic tanks or small sewage treatment plants for domestic use. These rules are designed to reduce the level of pollution from sewage in the nation’s watercourses.

Do you need planning permission to change a septic tank?

Is planning permission needed for a new septic tank? – The short answer is yes. You will need planning permission from a local authority in order to have a septic tank installed, no matter if it’s at your own home or on a business site. Planning consent must be obtained from your council, and there is a stringent set of regulations that must be followed and requirements needing to be met. .

Can you sell a property with a septic tank?

What information must you provide the buyer with? – If you’re selling a property with a septic tank, then you must be transparent with buyers about the fact the property uses a one and provide a detailed specification of the system. In fact, You are required by law to inform a buyer in writing about the presence of a septic tank. You should also let them know:

  • Where the septic tank is located
  • A description of the septic tank and the associated and drainage system
  • Details of any changes that have been made to the system
  • What kind of upkeep and maintenance the system needs
  • Whether there are any problems with the system
  • The age of the system
  • The date it was last emptied

Prior to selling your property, you should collate all documentation associated to the system and any paperwork detailing changes, repairs or maintenance that have been carried out since it was installed. You should always keep records for at least seven years.

How often should a septic tank be emptied?

How Often Should Septic Tank be Emptied? – As a general rule, you should only need to empty your septic tank once every three to five years. That being said, the actual frequency will vary depending on your usage and how many people are living in your home.

For larger households, your tank may need to be emptied more frequently. For a home with one person, on the other hand, they may only need to empty their tank every ten years. Pumping out your septic tank occasionally is essential for reliable operation.

A septic tank that is not working properly can pose serious problems for your home, including sewage back up in the drains in your home, or sewage bubbling up from the ground around your tank outside.

Do I need consent to discharge septic tank?

If you’re selling a property serviced by a septic tank you must have a consent to discharge in place – Do you have a septic tank? Do you have a consent to discharge in respect of the septic tank? If you are planning to sell your home and your answer to the first question is yes and your answer to the second is no or you are unsure then you need to find out quickly as it unlikely you will find someone to buy your property without a consent being in place.

A discharge consent is required if your home is not connected to the main public sewer. If you have an Emptying Agreement with NI Water in respect of the septic tank, contrary to some misconceptions, you will still require a consent to discharge.

A consent to discharge waste from a single domestic dwelling is granted by the Department of Agricultural, Environment and Rural Affairs (DAERA) following an application made using the WO1 form. Recommendations may be made by the local council’s Environment Health (Rivers) Officer.

Can I buy a house with an old septic tank?

So you’ve found your dream house in the countryside with stunning views of the surrounding fields and you’re excited to enjoy some peace and quiet. What you may not have considered is that rural houses aren’t always connected to the mains drainage system, meaning it will have an off mains system like a septic tank.

Knowing exactly what to do with a septic tank and learning how they function will help you avoid costly mistakes. Here’s our guide to buying a house with a septic tank. What is a septic tank? Most properties in the UK are connected to a mains drainage connection meaning most home-owners don’t need to think about where their waste is going.

The small selection of properties that are not close to a mains drainage system will have self-contained waste disposals such as a septic tank, cesspit or sewage treatment plant. A septic tank is used to divide the waste into solids and liquids so that it can be correctly disposed of.

  • The waste will then be collected by a liquid waste disposal company;
  • Buying a house with a septic tank To avoid meeting problems when you move into your new home, ask the current owners plenty of questions so you know what you’re dealing with;

They are legally required to provide you with the following information: ● A description of the treatment system and drainage system ● Where the drainage system is located ● Maintenance and emptying records ● Details of any changes made to the system ● Details of how the system should be maintained and a maintenance manual Book a home buyer drainage survey When buying a house with a septic tank, you should book a home buyer drainage survey to determine if there are any issues with the property’s drainage system.

They are able to uncover any common problems such as defective pipes, blockages, tree root intrusions and collapses. It’s important to know everything about the septic tank before you move in, as if these problems aren’t discovered, they may become a bigger issue and you’ll be left with costly repairs.

Septic Tanks (Spanish with subtitles)

How will owning a septic tank affect me? Owning a house with a septic tank means you are responsible for ensuring the system is compliant with the General Binding Rules. Here is some more information regarding the legal requirements of septic tanks. You need to arrange an annual inspection, service and empty to ensure it is well maintained.

You’ll also need to consider what access there is to the septic tank as there should be sufficient space for a HGV sized vehicle, so that workers can get close enough to empty the tank. R & A Cleansing provide liquid waste removal for a range of off mains drainage systems including septic tanks, cesspits, holding tanks and Klargester systems to ensure your waste management is handled efficiently.

We offer quality septic tank services across Cornwall to conveniently and safely dispose of your waste. For septic tank advice or to discover our other services, call us on 01566 782 852 or visit our website .

Who is responsible for septic tank?

Tips for Maintaining a Healthy Septic Tank – The first, simple and efficient way of avoiding any septic tank issues is by not flushing any items down the toilet which could damage it. The golden rule is to stick to the 3 P’s ( Pee, Paper and Poo ) and to familiarise yourself with how to maintain a septic tank.

It’s important to understand the damage that may be caused by flushing and draining certain pieces of waste (such as food, hair, nappies, sanitary towels and tampons, cigarette buts, cotton buds, baby wipes, etc) which can and will over time block your septic system, causing problems with drainage, foul odours and the potential to cause expensive issues with your soakaway.

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Being mindful and respectful of the drainage system is essential for a healthy septic system.

Do I have to replace my septic tank by 2020?

Under the new rules, if you have a specific septic tank that discharges to surface water (river, stream, ditch, etc. ) you are required to upgrade or replace your septic tank treatment system to a full sewage treatment plant by 2020, or when you sell a property, if it’s prior to this date.

How close to the house can a septic tank be?

– A full foundation must be 10 feet from the septic tank and 20 feet from the leaching area. – A slab foundation such as a garage must be 10 feet from the septic tank and 10 feet from the leaching area.

How far should a septic tank be from the house?

Installation of Sewerage Tanks – I hereby would like to bring your attention to the below mentioned Section dealing with the different types of sewerage tanks, taken from the Mossel Bay “Water Services By-Law” for implementation from the 25 th of June 2021 relating to all applications submitted for building plan approval from the previously mentioned date.

SEPTIC TANKS AND TREATMENT PLANTS (1) The municipality may approve and determine, on such conditions as it may prescribe, the disposal of sewage or other effluent by means of septic tanks or other on-site sewage treatment plants.

(2) A septic tank or other sewage treatment plant on a site must not be situated closer than 3 meters to any dwelling unit or to any boundary of the premises on which it is situated. (3) Effluent from a septic tank or other on-site sewage treatment plant must be disposed of to the satisfaction of the municipality.

  1. (4) A septic tank must be watertight, securely covered and provided with gas-tight means of access to its interior adequate to permit the inspection of the inlet and outlet pipes and adequate for the purpose of removing sludge;

(5) A septic tank serving a dwelling unit must— (a) have a capacity below the level of the invert of the outlet pipe of not less than 500 liters per bedroom, subject to a minimum capacity below such an invert level of 2 500 liters; (b) have an internal width of not less than 1 meter measured at right angles to the direction of the flow; (c) have an internal depth between the cover and the bottom of the tank of not less than 1,7 meter; and (d) retain liquid to a depth of not less than 1,4 meter.

  • (6) Septic tanks or other on-site sewage treatment plans serving premises other than a dwelling unit must be designed and certified by a Professional Engineer registered as a member of the Engineering Council of South Africa;

(7) No rain water, storm-water, or effluent other than that approved by the municipality may be discharged into a septic tank. FRENCH DRAINS (1) The municipality may, on such conditions as it may prescribe having regard to the quantity and the nature of the effluent and the nature of the soil as determined by the permeability test prescribed by the South African Bureau of Standards, approve the disposal of waste-water or other effluent by means of French drains, soakage pits or other approved works.

  1. (2) A French drain, soakage pit or other similar work shall not be situated closer than 5 m to any dwelling unit or to any boundary of any premises on which it is situated, nor in any such position that will, in the opinion of the municipality, cause contamination of any borehole or other source of water which is, or may be, used for drinking purposes, or cause dampness in any building;

(3) The dimensions of any French drain, soakage pit or other similar work shall be determined in relation to the absorbent qualities of the soil and the nature and quantity of the effluent. (4) French drains serving premises other than a dwelling house must be designed and certified by a Professional Engineer registered as a member of the Engineering Council of South Africa.

CONSERVANCY TANKS (1) The municipality may, on such conditions as it may prescribe; approve the construction of a conservancy tank and ancillary appliances for retention of sewage or effluent. (2) Conservancy tanks serving premises other than a dwelling unit must be designed and certified by a Professional Engineer registered as a member of the Engineering Council of South Africa.

(3) No rain water, storm-water, or effluent other than approved by the municipality may be discharged into a conservancy tank. (4) No conservancy tank must be used as such unless— (a) the invert of the tank slopes towards the outlet at a gradient of not less than 1 in 10; (b) the tank is gas and water tight; (c) the tank has an outlet pipe, 100 mm in internal diameter, made of wrought iron, cast iron or other approved material, and except if otherwise approved by the municipality, terminating at an approved valve and fittings for connection to the municipality’s removal vehicles; (d) the valve and fittings referred to in paragraph (c) or the outlet end of the pipe, as the case may be, are located in a chamber that has hinged cover approved by the Municipality or its authorized agent and which is situated in a position required by the municipality; (e) access to the conservancy tank must be provided by means of an approved manhole fitted with a removable cast iron cover placed immediately above the visible spigot of the inlet pipe.

5) The municipality may, having regard to the position of a conservancy tank or of the point of connection for a removal vehicle, require the owner or customer to indemnify the municipality, in writing, against any liability for any damages that may result from rendering of that service as a condition for emptying the tank.

(6) Where the municipality’s removal vehicle has to traverse private premises for the emptying of a conservancy tank, the owner shall provide a roadway at least 3,5 m wide, so hardened as to be capable of withstanding a wheel load of 4 metric tons in all weather, and shall ensure that no gateway through which the vehicle is required to pass to reach the tank, shall be less than 3,5 m wide for such purposes.

(7) The owner or occupier of premises on which a conservancy tank is installed shall at all times maintain the tank in good order and condition to the satisfaction of the municipality In summary, ·          No SEPTIC TANKS AND TREATMENT PLANTS constructed on a site are to be situated closer than 3 meters to any dwelling unit or to any boundary of the premises.

·          The minimum capacity level below the invert level are be not less than 2 500 liters ·          FRENCH DRAINS, SOAKAGE PITS OR OTHER SIMILAR WORKS shall not be situated closer than 5 m to any dwelling unit or to any boundary of any premises on which it is situated, nor in any such position that will, in the opinion of the municipality, cause contamination of any borehole or other source of water which is, or may be, used for drinking purposes, or cause dampness in any building.

  • Taken in consideration the above mentioned and taking into account the sizes of the properties within our Jurisdiction, it would be safe to say that where no Municipal sewerage line are provided, Conservancy Tanks are to be installed and these Conservancy Tanks are to be designed and signed-off by a Competent Person (Structural Engineer);

As such, all applications containing the installation/construction of a Conservancy Tank, submitted for consideration of Building plan Approval are to be accompanied by an Engineers Appointment for sign-off of such installation/construction. For the purposes of emptying these tanks, a suction pipe are to be laid to the front of the property, fitted with a suction head and enclosed in a manhole for easy access when required to be emptied.

Anti-Fraud Hotline: 0800 333 466
Print this email only if necessary. Go Green / Druk hierdie e-pos net as dit noodsaaklik is. Gaan Groen.

Mossel Bay Municipality email disclaimer: http://www. mosselbay. gov. za/disclaimer. htm Mossel Bay Municipality, 101 Marsh Street, Mossel Bay, 6506, South Africa Tel: +27 44 606 5000 www. mosselbay. gov. za.

Does Colorado require septic inspection?

Law On Septic Tanks In Spain If you are looking to sell or purchase real estate with a septic system in the state of Colorado, it is important for you to know the local transfer of title requirements, so you don’t get stuck in a sh–, well let’s just say, less than ideal situation. Many Colorado counties have enacted specific regulations regarding septic system requirements for permitting, including certification before a home can be sold, making understanding title transfer even more complicated. What is an on-site wastewater treatment system? An on-site wastewater treatment system (” OWTS ” or ” Septic System “) treats wastewater on an individual’s property.

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Septic Systems are installed on properties that cannot be served by a wastewater utility. Many Colorado counties have enacted new regulations governing the use and permitting of Septic Systems, including OWTS transfer-of-title inspections and permitting requirements.

These regulations stemmed from the Water Quality Control Commission of the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment adopting Regulation #43, which established minimum standards for the location, design, construction, installation, and alternation of Septic Systems within Colorado. Law On Septic Tanks In Spain Is a permit required for a Septic System in Colorado? Yes, under the Colorado On-Site Wastewater Treatment System Act, all Septic Systems must have permits issued by local boards of health or the commission in Colorado for new installations, expansions, and repairs. There are various permitting requirements to adhere to in each applicable county. Additionally, each county’s regulations can vary, so it is important to confirm the county’s specific process before installing, maintaining, cleaning, or disposing of a Septic System.

It is important to adhere to these requirements to avoid Septic System litigation when transferring title. Some older OWTS in rural areas were “grandfathered in,” but more counties are requiring updates to systems before the property can be sold, particularly in instances where homes have additions to support more bedrooms and older, smaller tanks may be insufficient to meet the current household demands.

When is a Septic System inspection required to transfer property in Colorado? A county or local board of health may choose to, but does not have to, require a property owner of a residence or other building/facility served by a Septic System to have an inspection of that system done to demonstrate that the system is functioning according to design prior to the sale or transfer of title of the property. These counties are: Law On Septic Tanks In Spain

  • Adams County
  • Arapahoe County
  • Archuleta County
  • Boulder County
  • Broomfield County
  • Clear Creek County
  • Douglas County
  • El Paso County
  • Elbert County
  • Gilpin County
  • Gunnison County
  • Hinsdale County
  • Jefferson County
  • La Plata County
  • Lake County
  • Larimer County
  • Mineral County
  • Park County
  • Pitkin County
  • Pueblo County
  • San Juan County
  • Summit County

I am selling my home – do I need a permit or an updated inspection for my Septic System? Most likely, yes. More counties are starting to require by ordinance that a Septic System be up to date on permits and have a clean Septic System inspection before a sale or transfer of title is made. Also, the Colorado Real Estate Commission’s approved contract for buying and selling real estate in the state requires sellers to disclose issue with the property.

There are currently twenty-two (22) counties in Colorado that have a Septic System transfer-of-title inspection requirements. Each time a property in one of these counties transfers title, a septic system inspection is required to be performed.

With the geography of Colorado, more disputes are arising over the disclosure of Septic System permitting and functioning in rural areas. In order toTo save time, energy, and money in the future, it is best to ensure OWTS permitting is up to date and to have a Septic System inspection done before selling property in Colorado.

What happens when the seller of real estate fails to disclose a defective Septic System in Colorado? When a seller fails to disclose a defective Septic System, there are a handful of legal remedies, such as mediation, arbitration, or litigation, to compensate the buyer for Septic System expenses, the misrepresentation, and consequent legal fees.

Sellers should be aware of county Septic System regulations to ensure that they are not digging themselves into a dirty hole when transferring title. Likewise, buyers should understand the Septic System regulations applicable to their purchase in order to determine what remedies are available to them.

  1. If you are a seller or a buyer of real estate with a Septic System in Colorado, and you need help navigating the murky issues surrounding the title transfer, fill out an interest form today to see if GLO can help you;

Since 2016, GLO has been helping clients across Colorado keep their hands clean when it comes to Septic System issues. Law On Septic Tanks In Spain GLO has prepared this blog to provide general information on legal issues that may be of interest. This blog does not provide legal advice for any specific situation, and this does not create an attorney-client relationship between any reader and GLO or its attorneys. GLO engages clients only through specific fee arrangements and signed engagement letters.

What types of septic systems are allowed in PA?

Septic Systems – In urban and many suburban areas houses are connected to a sewer and homeowners don’t have to worry about where the water goes after they flush the toilet. In the country your responsibility for wastewater may not end with the flush. If your house is not hooked to a sewer, the wastewater your family generates flows literally into your own backyard.

  • Septic system problems can cause sewage to surface in your yard or produce sewage odors in your house;
  • A poorly maintained system could also contaminate a neighbor’s drinking water supply or your own;
  • On-lot wastewater treatment regulations for Pennsylvania are set forth in the Sewage Facilities Act (Act 537) and its 1994 amendment, Act 149;

Some basic on-lot systems routinely permitted for residential use include standard trench, absorption bed system, subsurface sand filter, and elevated sand mound. These standard systems cost approximately $4,000 to $20,000 when installed in new construction, depending on the system specifications, site features, and your area.

  • Replacing a malfunctioning system will be more expensive;
  • The local sewage enforcement officer, a certified official responsible for permitting the installation of on-lot wastewater disposal systems in one or several townships, can be a valuable source of information about system designs;

This officer is responsible for permitting installations and repairs. Contact your local municipality for information on reaching your local sewage enforcement officer. Wastewater treatment systems generally have three components: a septic tank, a distribution system (a gravity-fed mechanism or a dosing pump, which releases a specified amount of wastewater at preset intervals), and an absorption bed.

  • The septic tank is the initial repository of wastewater from the house;
  • It is a watertight, decay-resistant chamber usually made of concrete or plastic that keeps solids from entering and clogging the absorption bed (Figure 3);

To allow adequate settling of solids, liquid must remain in the tank for at least 24 hours. Bacteria slowly break down the solids to about 50 percent of the original volume. Clarified liquid discharges to the distribution system and then to the absorption bed, where clarified wastewater is absorbed into the surrounding soil for further purification. Law On Septic Tanks In Spain Figure 3. Cross-section of septic tank. Source: A. Jarrett, Septic Tank Pumping (University Park: The Pennsylvania State University, 2004).

How often should a 500 gallon septic tank be pumped?

Frequency of tank maintenance – How often you need to have our septic tank pumped depends on the size of the tank, how many people living in the home, and other factors like whether you have a garbage disposal or water softener system, and how often you do laundry or throw non-septic-friendly items down the drain. But here are some general guidelines:

  • Family of 2, 500-gallon tank – pump every 2. 5 years
  • Family of 3, 1000-gallon tank – pump every 4 years
  • Family of 5, 1000-gallon tank – pump every 2 years
  • Family of 5, 1500-gallon tank – pump every 3. 5 years

As you can see, the average is to have your tank pumped every 3-4 years. However, if you notice any signs of a septic system backup before then, don’t’ wait to get your tank pumped. Some signs to look out for include slow drains all over the house and gurgling sounds coming from the toilet when flushed.

Can you sell a property with a septic tank?

What information must you provide the buyer with? – If you’re selling a property with a septic tank, then you must be transparent with buyers about the fact the property uses a one and provide a detailed specification of the system. In fact, You are required by law to inform a buyer in writing about the presence of a septic tank. You should also let them know:

  • Where the septic tank is located
  • A description of the septic tank and the associated and drainage system
  • Details of any changes that have been made to the system
  • What kind of upkeep and maintenance the system needs
  • Whether there are any problems with the system
  • The age of the system
  • The date it was last emptied

Prior to selling your property, you should collate all documentation associated to the system and any paperwork detailing changes, repairs or maintenance that have been carried out since it was installed. You should always keep records for at least seven years.